Good morning, Thursday! This is an illustration of Humulus Lupulus, or Hops in English.  It’s a flavouring agent in beers, and is the dominant flavour in beers like India Pale Ales. 
Don’t take it for granted: for a while, hops was a controlled subject in the Kingdom of England, somewhat like marijuana is today. See, the English in the middle ages were accustomed to making Ale, which is brewed from malt alone, where as the Dutch on the mainland began flavouring their drinks with the cones from the hops in the 14th century, which they called Beer. The English were not only slow to appreciate the new flavour, they banned it altogether under Henry IV. And even later than that…"…The prejudice against the use of Hops was at first great. Henry VIII forbade brewers to put hops and sulphur into ale, Parliament having been petitioned against the Hop as ‘a wicked weed that would spoil the taste of the drink and endanger the people.’"
I’m not sure if the English constabulary were roaming through the streets of London and the countryside smashing down doors and breaking up grow-hops, but I like to think that this is the case. 

Good morning, Thursday! 

This is an illustration of Humulus Lupulus, or Hops in English.  It’s a flavouring agent in beers, and is the dominant flavour in beers like India Pale Ales. 

Don’t take it for granted: for a while, hops was a controlled subject in the Kingdom of England, somewhat like marijuana is today. See, the English in the middle ages were accustomed to making Ale, which is brewed from malt alone, where as the Dutch on the mainland began flavouring their drinks with the cones from the hops in the 14th century, which they called Beer. The English were not only slow to appreciate the new flavour, they banned it altogether under Henry IV. And even later than that…

"…The prejudice against the use of Hops was at first great. Henry VIII forbade brewers to put hops and sulphur into ale, Parliament having been petitioned against the Hop as ‘a wicked weed that would spoil the taste of the drink and endanger the people.’"

I’m not sure if the English constabulary were roaming through the streets of London and the countryside smashing down doors and breaking up grow-hops, but I like to think that this is the case. 

beatonna:

beckyandfrank:

It’s our brand new t-shirt in time for the holidays. Check out our li’l pretzel daschund (pronounced dash-und, not dock-son) all looking festive and fancy in his traditional mountain outfit! Get it now from TopatoCo!

oh my yes

beatonna:

beckyandfrank:

It’s our brand new t-shirt in time for the holidays. Check out our li’l pretzel daschund (pronounced dash-und, not dock-son) all looking festive and fancy in his traditional mountain outfit! Get it now from TopatoCo!

oh my yes

behindbobsburgers:

"Girl With a Pearl Ughhhhhhh" by Beth Clothier
(via robotsandcupcakes: Tina is my queen!)

behindbobsburgers:

"Girl With a Pearl Ughhhhhhh" by Beth Clothier

(via robotsandcupcakes: Tina is my queen!)

brumality:


—margaret atwood

brumality:

—margaret atwood

(Source: witchtower)

Soul Gems

In Steven Universe, Steven and the Crystal Gems all have gems embedded in their bodies that are the sources of their magical powers. I also notice that a lot of the monsters that they fight also have gems in them. You can see Garnet in the last minute of the Seventh episode picking up and spiriting away the gem that the monster dropped. In the first episode, when the bug monsters have gotten into the house and Amethyst kills one, she points out that it doesn’t have a gem. 

Is this a coincidence, or is there a connection between the Gems and the monsters? Is this going to be another Madoka? 

Raton Laveur indeed.

sillybird:

One of these is not like the others!

(Source: ydrill)

heyfunniest:

Bunny hopping on snow.

heyfunniest:

Bunny hopping on snow.

(Source: weeaboo-chan)

This beautiful illustration of a melon has an interesting story. It was drawn engraved and coloured by Elizabeth Blackwell in the mid 18th century, who did it  to save her husband from debtor’s prison.  She did over 500 engraving of rare and unfamiliar plants as part of “A Curious Herbal,” and sold the book bit by bit over 125 weeks. It was a success: people liked the meticulous illustration, and the botanists of the time needed a new herbal describing plants from the new world. She managed to raise enough money to pay their debts and free her husband. What happens next? If you stop here, the story has a happy ending. If you go on, the story takes a weird turn. 

This beautiful illustration of a melon has an interesting story. It was drawn engraved and coloured by Elizabeth Blackwell in the mid 18th century, who did it  to save her husband from debtor’s prison.  She did over 500 engraving of rare and unfamiliar plants as part of “A Curious Herbal,” and sold the book bit by bit over 125 weeks. It was a success: people liked the meticulous illustration, and the botanists of the time needed a new herbal describing plants from the new world. She managed to raise enough money to pay their debts and free her husband. 

What happens next? If you stop here, the story has a happy ending. If you go on, the story takes a weird turn.